Gold, silver and platinum ...

... are often and easy to find in Peru. Adventurers and gold-diggers fetch precious metals as nuggets and pads out of the river sand or feeder layers this very day. For the Incas, they were mythical bonded with „mother earth“ and renewed themselves frequently by the strength of the sun. They did not know iron. The Incas had a brilliant knowledge of the treatment of precious metals earlier than the Spanish. They knew how to cast, drive, braze and alloy gold and also how to define the melting points of gold. The exhibition of the Inca Treasures is a textbook of highly-developed art of goldsmithing.

For the Incas, gold was not a substantial value ...

... they did not know the meaning of money. Gold was sacred and reserved for the gentry, similar to the fine wool of the best lama species (Vicunas). They estimated as a gift of the gods and the image of the sun, from which it was born. The brilliance and converting were important, but not the amount of the gold. Razor-thin gold masks had been regarded as precious as massive big cups or crowns. The Spanish often had to melt down hundreds of pieces of jewellery to send a gold bar to their king. The exposed treasures are evidence of this.

Gold served the Incas in life and death ...

... and there priests took sacred beverages from big golden cups, but they also teared the vellicating heart out of the chests of the prisoners of war with golden knives („tumis“) as gods sacrifices. Golden instruments were used in medicine, golden jewellery attended the dead in the grave. Gold earned the Inca sovereigns as sons of the sun adoration and force, gold sealed the destiny of their peoples. Not much remained, neither from the people, nor from the treasures. The shown Inca treasure gives us a feeling of the brilliance and the high culture of the Inca peoples of the Andes.

Gold and the avidity for it ...

... drove the Spanish to Latin America. They incured enormous exertions, battled their way through forests, adversary hosts and gasped exhausted for breath in the highlands. They left their families and women behind, did not know if they would return. The located, blackmailed or stolen gold only had a substantial value for them. They distrusted the new gods and regarded themselves as the true owners of all treasures in the new spanish settlements. The gold did not bring good luck to them soever: they killed each other, were blagged by pirates, scuttled by storms on their way to Spain and caused the first and biggest inflation of Europe and the new countries: The gold treasure shown conformed in Peru to the countervalue of a few ducks produced in Spain.